Courses or Coaching - How do you best help your employees learn and grow?

Courses or Coaching - How do you best help your employees learn and grow?

On a daily basis, HR and learning and development leaders must decide how best to use their resources to train and develop the employees of their organization. In this article, we take a closer look at when sending employees on courses works, and when individualized coaching is the best investment.

Daniel Richardsson | Mar 22nd, 2021

On a daily basis, HR and learning and development leaders must decide how best to use their resources to upskill, train and develop the leaders and employees of their organization. In this article, we take a closer look at when sending employees on courses works, and when individualized coaching is the best investment for the present and the future

Training Courses and Professional Coaching - What is the difference?

The difference between a general course and coaching is the direct, personal intervention the leader or employee experiences. A general course is, well... general. A study conducted by the American Psychological Association into the Effectiveness of Individual Coaching, Self-Coaching, and Group Training explains:

“If there is a general need to systematically prepare employees to perform on specific tasks, group training seems appropriate...”

However,

“when certain aspects of working conditions or individual development goals are paramount, coaching might be indicated”

The Pitfalls of General Training and Development Courses

Organizations turn to training courses for several reasons. The most common is when there are general weaknesses within the team. Or when a different skill set is needed for the organization to reach higher levels of performance and success.

The usual practice is to send groups on a course together, like first aid, manual handling or software training. Or give an open invite course where anyone is welcome to join. These courses might be tailored for the whole organization when new software or systems training is needed or with a general aim to help organizations upskill leaders and employees.

There are, however, some upfront challenges with this way of helping team members to learn and grow.

1. Course is not individualized or timely

The fact is that what is learned through courses is not always individualized for the specific employee or organization. S/he may not experience the training as relevant for their career or progression, especially if the timing is unfavorable.

Courses should take place at a time in a person's life where s/he finds it relevant, and can clearly see the meaning of the content presented. This might be harder to ensure with a general course where topics covered are not tailored to the employee's ambitions. Furthermore, if employees are enrolled just because the budget exists rather than for their benefit, it might be money wasted.

2. Course topics and learnings are not put into action

Use it or lose it. General courses have a real problem in that most information gets forgotten. If information is not used directly after being learned, employees will soon forget it. It is sad but true. Most of us have experienced this.

For training to avoid this pitfall; it needs to ensure hands-on elements with role-playing, practice, and feedback. If the course involves people using simulations, real-life training, some gamification; the learning becomes assimilated and is worth the time and money invested. If not, it can just be wasted time and effort.

3. Courses are too short

Courses are almost always high-intensity learning which does not give the employees the benefit of continuous development over time. If we want the learnings to stick, we need to give people time to take everything in.

Employees need space and time to reflect on the topics and methodologies presented to them. They need opportunities to try things out, get feedback and then apply learnings in real-life situations. It's helpful to arrange refresher days in the months following to ensure the learning is not lost. This keeps the course from simply being a “one-off” experience.

When are courses a good idea?

Most companies use general courses to teach employees about policies, standard operating procedures, or specific ways of doing things. These tend to be generic and rarely need individualization. In these instances, you may offer your employees general training, or advice and mentoring, where you role-model and tell people how to do things.

If your aim is for the employee to think for himself/herself, come up with their solutions, and challenge the conventional ways of doing things - coaching should be your go-to.

Coaching Ensures an Individualized Learning Journey

One of the transformational benefits of coaching from the recipient's perspective and experience is individualization. Coaching is a 1:1, tailored journey, ensuring focused and fruitful learning. By customizing each coaching journey to the individual, you:

  • Address the specific needs of the individual and business
  • Match the learning style of the individual
  • You begin from the starting level of the leader or employee
  • Don’t waste employee time with ineffective one-size-fits-all approaches
  • Progress each individual in a tailored direction at a pace that suits them
  • Extend the coaching process so that the learning can grow into new habits

With continuous support, the individual can try out new behavior and get feedback. They can go deeper into the underlying mechanisms that enable or hinder growth in themselves and their organization.

Habit-building

When it comes to learning and building new habits, it is vital to ensure that the individual is supported continuously, not just for a few days or months. Changing habits takes time. It requires you to be challenged in using your newly learned behaviors. When it comes to reskilling and capability building, a couple of repetitions or days will not do the job. It takes hard work to create new habits.

The McKinsey report explains that being asked, as an individual, to do something completely different needs far more than a demonstration or a motivational speech. They need to be coached, helped, and given feedback after using the new skills in real-life situations. Taking small steps, one at a time, instead of trying to change everything at the same time, is paramount. If you need further confirmation about habit building and change, have a listen to habit expert, James Clear.

it is equally important to understand that it is a continuous process. We cannot just switch to new habits easily. It is too easy to fall back to “what we have always done" - our old habits. It feels secure and safe, even though it no longer makes sense, serves us, or even pays off.  We must appreciate why starting new things” seems so hard. It is because we need to rewire our brains, and body systems to think and act in new ways. For some, that might trigger some fear. We fear the change. And most of us become easily discouraged in the beginning because of the anxiety for failure.

In the McKinsey Quarterly, Achi and Berger share that we need to train ourselves to "delight in the possible". They suggest this because we are too used to telling ourselves, that there is one straight answer or one way of doing things. This isn’t true. To assist our delight in the possible, they recommend training three simple habits, where we deliberately try to:

  • Ask different questions
  • Take multiple perspectives and
  • See systems

Does this sound familiar to you? Well, then perhaps, it is because this is what you learn through coaching. Coaching brings new and different questions to the table. It helps us take multiple perspectives. It makes us connect the dots, make sense and find meaning in the systems we act in.

Continuously making progress

On a final note: The act of reaching personal goals, organizational results, and continually making progress in meaningful work bring us new creative energy. This is why Session´s subscription model offers continuous coaching for your leaders and employees. It strengthens their ability to stay focused on progressing and offers someone to reach out to when you are not making progress. In the words of Amabile and Kramer, (authors of the book “The Progress Principle), it strengthens their “inner work life”.

Leader's and employee's perceptions become clear through coaching. Their emotions and pride increase along with their motivation and courage to operate differently in ways that general courses do not.

In Conclusion

The question was: What is the best way to help your employees learn and grow?

Courses offer predefined scripts as to how and what the employee should learn. This is effective when there is a general need to systematically prepare employees to perform specific tasks.

However, when certain aspects of working conditions or individual development goals are paramount, coaching is the best investment. A coach uses tailored, and relatable intrinsic motivation to enable the realization of potential and optimization of leaders and employees. Coaching goes far beyond generic lessons of prescribed learning by guiding employees to think for themselves and steer companies in new directions.

We hope that we have illuminated the difference between upskilling and developing your leaders and employees through courses versus coaching.

If you are looking for coaching advice, please reach out.  We will be delighted to guide you toward the right learning and development programs and questions for your organization. Session is here to help you move towards a more successful, and beautiful future!

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Meet the author

Daniel Richardsson

Daniel Richardsson

Business Coach, Session

Organizational and Leadership Consultant

Strengths-Based, Sweden


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